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Activity pack flashing

How to run a Workshop with the Flashing Card Activity Pack

Instructions and best practice for your group activity with Electric Paint

 

 

In this tutorial, we will guide you through how to run a successful workshop using our Flashing Card Activity Pack. The pack makes a great activity in any science classroom or technology group, and supports STEAM and the Design & Technology curriculum. The age range suited to this activity is quite broad- from around 6 -16 years, but we have seen many adults have fun making flashing cards too!

The pack has everything you need to complete a working circuit card, but any extra materials are listed above. Please follow the instruction photos of a card being made and read our best practice tips for how to make the most of your workshop.

Instructions are available to read inside the pack, but if in some case your card does not blink, please check out our directions on troubleshooting here.

Please Note: This product has been discontinued but will be available from our resellers until approximately September 2017.  A list of the resellers stocking it can be found on our FAQ page.

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Materials

In your Activity Pack you will find:

1 x Step-by-step Instructions
10 x Electric Paint Pens
30 x Robot Colouring Card Templates
30 x 3V Coin Cell Batteries
30 x Flashing LEDs (Red, Yellow and Green)

Extra materials:

Scissors
A pin for poking holes in your card
Colouring pencils

Step 1

Decorating the Robot Card

(20 minutes)

Kids know exactly what to do when you say ‘colour in’, but why not try some christmassy designs or ask the group to draw clothes on their Robot! You can elaborate however you wish. Remember- very dark colours may disguise the trace of your circuit, so if you want to see what your doing with the Electric Paint pen later, keep to light shades.

Step 2

Cut out your switch

(2 minutes)

With a pair of scissors snip the small dashed lines either side of the switch. This will allow you to close your switch later.
DO NOT cut the dotted fold line.

Step 3

Make Pinholes

(2 minutes)

Put a piece of cardboard or newspaper under the template. Push the pin through the pinholes on each side of the LED and battery (see key). Take care not
to prick yourself!

Step 4

Insert LED

(2 minutes)

Insert the LED at the symbol (see key). Push the long leg in the positive hole and the short leg in the negative hole. Bend legs apart to secure. LED Note LEDs and batteries are polarised. This means electricity will only flow in one direction through them from the positive leg of the battery to the positive leg of the LED. The longer leg of the LED is positive. Make sure you put the components in the right direction!

Step 5

Insert battery

(2 minutes)

Insert battery at the battery symbol (see key). Push the top leg (the side going over the yellow band) in the positive hole and bottom leg in the negative hole. Lift up the battery and squeeze a blob of paint on the circuit at the base of the negative leg. Push through and bend legs apart to secure.

Make sure not to short circuit- if the legs of the battery touch each other the current will run into itself and short circuit the battery.

Step 6

Paint the circuit

(15 min. – including drying time)

Paint the circuit and switch Squeeze a continuous bead of Electric Paint over the grey line, right up to the component legs. Make sure the line is thick enough to allow enough electricity to run through to the LED (see picture to the right). The paint has to touch the legs of the component to make the connection, and must not have a break in the line on either side of the components. Add a nice blob at the base of the legs to ensure good contact. Don’t forget to paint the grey square on your switch.

Leave 10 minutes in a warm spot until completely dry.
Helpful hint — you could use the drying time to talk about how the circuit works and to introduce further learning outcomes. This is a good opportunity to extend your workshop.

Activity pack flashing

Step 7

Fold Card

(2 minutes)

Check your paint to make sure it is completely dry. It should no longer be tacky to the touch. Then you can fold the greeting card and switch along the dotted lines to finish your
greeting card.

Step 8

Close Switch

(2 minutes)

The fun bit—fold your switch forward so that the black square of paint makes contact with the two open circuit lines. The LED should start to blink when the surfaces meet!

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Categories

Bare Conductive

Date Posted

2010/12/04

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