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Tactile Interactive Installation Explores Life

This new project, titled comes‘3’ from Malta-based artist and musician, Sandrina DeGabriele.

With a background in graphic design and branding, Sandrina is currently experimenting with how the visual, aural and tactile senses can be combined.

We wanted to learn more about her interactive installation and what the ‘3’ means.

The project explores the combination of the tactile, aural and visual senses, creating a link between them. Three people of different ages were chosen to participate in this project to reflect different stages of life.

Through qualitative research, soundscapes were created using recorded sounds. These aim to renew a sense of attachment to three stages of life: birth and childhood, adulthood, and elderly life and death.

Shapes, points of contact, and lines, visually come together in the form of three artworks forming a three-sided column created using conductive paint. The soundscapes are associated with past memories.

This interactive project resulted in creating a journey through life, experienced visually, aurally and tactually.

The artworks were printed in black and white on a honeycomb panel. Metal nails were hammered into the panel on the ‘points of contact’ – that is, where she wanted each soundscape to be heard.

The objective of this project was to create a soundscape where people must ‘play’ with the piece to find the sounds.

Once the nails were hammered in the panel, Sandrina used Electric Paint to paint on top of the black thick lines where she wanted to trigger a sound. This added to the tactility the artist wanted to emphasise.

On the back of the panel, she used alligator wires to attach to the nails and connect them to the Touch Board. The Touch Board was then connected to a power bank.

When a person touched the point of contact or ran his/her finger along the line, they could hear a particular soundscape.

In order to create an intimate setting, wireless headphones were connected to the touch board so the person was able to move around the piece freely.

A smaller panel was exhibited at the University of Malta as part of ‘Pocemucka’.

Images: Sandrina DeGabriele

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